FEATURED ALUMNI

Lena Goodnough
Animation & VFX

2015 Alumna

3D Modeler & Animator: Parsons

lenagoodnough.com

I didn’t grow up knowing that one day I would go into 3D modeling and animation. In fact, I spent my whole life planning to be a teacher. After a surprising last minute change of majors, which shocked both my parents and myself, I started studying video game design at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. There, I got an excellent education and learned a lot about the process of making a video game. However, what really interested me where my classes in modeling and animation. I started to realize that my true passion was in 3D modeling. That was what I wanted my career to focus around.

 

Upon graduation I was all set to start modeling for video games, but I realized that, despite my hard work and good education, my skills just weren’t up to snuff to break into the industry. I said goodbye to Ohio and moved to Chicago to hone my skills at Tribeca Flashpoint College. There, I concentrated on learning strong modeling techniques. My choice to add two more years of education into my life really paid off, and now I find myself more confident in my abilities and employed doing what I love. Currently, I am working as a 3D modeler and animator at Parsons Corporation in Chicago.

 

You might have heard the phrase “knowledge is power,” and I have to say that it’s actually true. In high school I was very caught up in getting A’s, but it never really mattered to me if I actually understood what I was taught. I was really good at regurgitating information, but not very good at actually learning anything. Going through two colleges, followed by a job search, really made me realize that every skill you acquire gives you more opportunity to choose your career and your own path in life. I want to encourage everyone to absorb all the knowledge you need to do what you love. It might take a while, but it’ll be worth it. Focus on learning and acquiring skills and the good grades and opportunities will follow.

    

Eliana Barnett
Animation & VFX

2015 Alumna

3D Modeler & Animator: Parsons

ElianaBarnett.com

I graduated from Tribeca Flashpoint College on May 2015 with a degree in Animation and VFX and focused in 3D modeling. I am currently working at Parsons Corporation as a 3D Modeler/Animator and love the work environment there. It is very relaxed and everyone here is willing to help if you have any questions.

 

Keeping in touch with Career Services once your job search starts is something I highly recommend. They are always willing to help you through the steps of the job search and provide job leads. I would not have made it here if it weren’t for their help. 

Meredith Norman
Recording Arts

2015 Alumna

Audio Assistant: Doner

MeredithNorman.com

As a young child, I was always fixated with the sounds of the world around me. I would listen to music all day and try to figure out how each instrument blended together so seamlessly. In my early teen years, I started buying various music production programs. I would sit on the computer for hours making little beats. Eventually, I figured out how to manipulate sounds and create full songs. In high school, I taught myself how to play guitar and bought an interface, condenser microphone and Cubase to start recording instruments and vocals. Before I knew it, I was recording friends in my little homemade studio.  

 

After high school, I attended Central Michigan University for two years to study Audio Engineering. At CMU, I was part of a record label that recorded bands and put on live concerts for local artists. I also took some broadcast classes to get a feel for the radio industry. During the summer between my freshman and sophomore years, I interned at a post-production studio in Southfield, MI called Ron Rose Milagro. I was so obsessed with music; I never thought working at a post house producing commercials would interest me. Little did I know, I would come to love recording voiceovers and creating sound design. Post-production was a whole new world of audio that I’d never been exposed to!

 

After two years at Central, I choose to transfer to complete my degree at a more industry driven college which specialized in the recording arts. I was referred to Tribeca Flashpoint by an audio engineer that had worked in the industry for a while. I toured the school and fell in love with the faculty and equipment! The gear was modern and fresh in the industry. During my first year, I studied both music production and sound design. I always loved music production, but I started to develop a passion for working on post-production, video games and advertisements. One of the major reasons I loved sound design was because I could still incorporate music into the project, while also working with sound effects, dialogue and voiceovers. To finalize my decision on which path to continue studying (music production vs. sound design), I decided to do an internship at a music-recording studio in my second year at Tribeca. This was very valuable because I had real life experiences in both parts of the industry. After a hard decision, I decided to finish my final year at Tribeca in the sound design path.

 

After college, my ultimate goal was to move back home to Michigan and find a job at a post-production company. This was a very scary time in my life because like most college graduates, I wasn’t sure where I was going to work. To ensure that I was prepared when I left college, I started interviewing with different companies prior to graduating.  Fortunately, I interviewed at an advertising agency called Doner and accepted a paid position to be their audio intern for the summer. After the internship, I am happy to say I was offered a job to stay with the agency and become an audio assistant for the company’s new studio.


My advice for aspiring audio engineers is to be humble and always strive to improve your skills. Constantly seek new work opportunities and be open to different projects. The more versatile you are, the better off you will be. Also, network with everybody! Don’t be shy, ask questions and be flexible when working with all different types of people. This industry can be tough, but there are jobs out there if you’re willing to work hard enough.

Mitchel Mussatto

Film & Broadcast

2011 Alumnus 

President & Creative

Director:

Junior Giant Productions

www.jrgiantproductions.com

 

 

As a small business owner I enjoy the challenges that accompany every aspect toward making a piece of media. Managing a team of creatives toward a common vision while balancing the financial and logistical end of each project. There’s a lot of long hours, 7 days a week of meetings, shoots, networking, you name it. It all pays out in the incredible satisfaction of seeing your initial idea reach it’s potential as a piece of media.

 

The best advice I could give is to embrace opportunity. Opportunities will come at the most unexpected, inconvenient times. The willingness to commit to new chances, regardless of your current situation, is crucial. You never know how far your next job can take you. Be open to changing direction. Say yes as often as you can, work tirelessly, and you’ll find the career that is most rewarding to you. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christon Thurston

Design & VisCom

2015 Alumnus 

Production Assistant:

Media Process Group

christonthurston.com

 

The two biggest takeaways I’ve received from my employment with Media Process Group are exposure and experience. Working as a Production Assistant it can be easy to develop a stagnant mindset of doing “grunt” work or feeling low on the totem pole compared to your contemporaries. But having the opportunity to work on numerous projects and learn from some of the best in the world of film and media production has instilled the importance that everyone plays on the complete product no matter the role or position. Seeing your name in credits not only makes you proud but encourages you to keep pushing further.

 

If I could offer one nugget of advice to those transitioning from the academic world to the career field it would be “The 3 P’s” - practice purposeful patience with your search for employment. Understand that your dream job likely won’t be your first job, but it can be your future job. Most people get frustrated and impatient with the path it takes to reach that ideal position but don’t discredit those small steps necessary for the journey. Even if it’s not in your industry there’s no telling what doors might open or who you might be introduced to. Also network, network, network… Did I mention networking??

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Justin Wagner

Animation & VFX

2016 Alumnus 

Associate Artist:

NetherRealm Studios

www.netherrealm.com

 

 

The thing I love most about working at NetherRealm is the freedom to bring my creativity to life and to have the opportunity to work with all of the super talented artists that work here.

 

Job searching is very overwhelming, but I would say the best tactic to use during the job search is to try to talk to as many people as possible. Submitting a resume can only get you so far. Send emails and even phone calls. Connect with recruiters on LinkedIn and maybe send a quick "Hello" message. You are trying to show your ambition and stand out to your future employers. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andy Urquiaga

Game & Interactive

Media

2015 Alumnus 

Game Engineer:

InContext Solutions

incontextsolutions.com

The best aspect of working at InContext is definitely the work environment. It's full of fun, positive, and hardworking people. The company really stresses craftsmanship and ownership of your work which helps me do the best that I can in a really positive way.

Job searching is very overwhelming, but I would say the best tactic to use during the job search is to try to talk to as many people as possible. Submitting a resume can only get you so far. Send emails and even phone calls. Connect with recruiters on LinkedIn and maybe send a quick "Hello" message. You are trying to show your ambition and stand out to your future employers. 

My advice is to keep your goal visualized in your head at all times and don't turn down an opportunity.  It gets tough trying to find a "dream job" and it's important that it might not happen immediately. You have to stay open to all opportunities that come your way, you never know what they will lead to. Every step is a step closer to where you're goal lies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kaleigh Cox

Design & VisCom

2016 Alumna 

Jr. Graphic Designer:

Elite Communications 

Group

kaleighcoxdesigns.com

What I like most about working at Elite Communications Group is getting more direct and hands-on experience working with clients.

 

My advice for anybody looking for a job is to treat job searching as an actual job. Also, to email companies even if they aren't hiring. I made multiple connections and freelance opportunities by sending companies my portfolio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brad Mortenson

Design & VisCom

2016 Alumnus

Graphic Designer at

Ideology Entertainment

What I like most about working at Ideology Entertainment, is that they let me work in every aspect of their design needs. So if it's doing restaurant menus and how we can improve that, I'm the guy who is in charge of the design work, flow and experience; and they trust my expertise.

 

As far as advice is concerned, APPLY TO EVERY POSITION AVAILABLE! Seriously, anything to get experience under your belt. Hell, I got the position I'm in because I applied to an internship that loosely applied to Design. They had a need for a Designer and I was then offered a full-time position. So, don't ever think you're too good or good enough for a job, you'll limit how much is out there for you to take.

 

Kya Koplin

Film

2014 Alumna (LA) 

Writer's Assistant:

New Scripted Show

on Viceland

How did your experience at TFC help you secure your recent position as Writer's Assistant?

 

Going to TFC helped me better understand where I wanted to go following college. I never expected to become a writer's assistant, but because of the classes I had to take I am familiar with the software, Final Draft.  If I never used Final Draft the transition would have been harder. 

What would you look for if you were in the position to hire new graduates from TFC?

What I consider a good candidate is someone with a legible résumé. If you do not have a good résumé at the beginning, it's tough. So, when you are creating your résumé and need more stuff on it, reach out to people and shadow roles you want to do and try to get as many internships as possible. Make your own films/shorts/commercials/comedy sketches and put them in! I like people who are always working and reflects that on their résumés.  

If you had it to do all over again, what would you do differently?

 

If I could go back and do it all over, I would have made more videos and networked harder while I was in Chicago. It was tough since I was on the fast-track 15-month program, but as I said earlier, a crisp and loaded résumé always looks good. I wish I tried to go to more film events and make it happen in Chicago. I thought it didn't matter much and was going to run out to LA and network there, but DO NOT make that mistake. Some of the biggest connections I made are through people my parents or I knew in Chicago. 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

After graduating college looking for a full-time job with benefits can be hard, especially if you are trying to move out to LA. My advice is simple. If you want to move to LA you need to have a plan. If you know you are going out to LA please make sure you have enough money. It's expensive and if you don't have the money and your parents can't help you, save up $5,000 before you even consider moving without a job. NO ONE will hire you unless you are living in LA. It took me 3 months to finally get an okay job and 4-5 months to land a long-term gig. Plan ahead and save up because once you're out in LA you can make it with a little hard work and reaching out to everyone and anyone. Good luck! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Graham

Film

2014 Alumna 

Filmmaker,

Cinematographer and

Editor

carriegraham.net

What I like most about being a Filmmaker, Cinematographer and Editor, is that everyday I have the chance to see new things and to explore their meaning through the lens of a camera.

 

As far as advice for recent graduates is concerned, is to make the most of Chicago. There's a lot out there for people who are proactively seeking out new experiences.

Carrie's first job after graduating was working as the Director of Digital Photography on the experimental documentary "Drifting Towards The Crescent" produced by Fieldstone Films and funded through the Chicago Digital Media Fund. Just recently, this film got accepted into the Rotterdam International Film Festival and made the 50 Most Anticipated American Films list in Filmmaker Magazine!

Sam Johnston

Film

2014 Alumnus 

Editor at 

Trillium Productions

Sam is currently a Video Editor at Trillium Productions, LLC. Sam's passion project for the past year has been a video podcast called "the sesh", which gets up close and personal with up-and-coming artists.

 

The first season is underway and Sam's team is just about to start production on season two. Sam and his team recently partnered with TFC for the duration of the season. Because this is a music show, students from all departments can be involved and will get hands-on experience in television and concert production. It's not only a fun initiative to be a part of, and not to mention, the great connections participating students could make with participating artists.

Check out the promo trailer of the sesh, as well as other content HERE!

We asked Sam a few questions and here's what he had to say!

What do you like most about working at Trillium Productions, LLC?


Trillium Productions, LLC has been a great experience as my first job out of school. They focus mostly on industrial and educational films, which is not a part of the industry that I knew much about. Though it is not necessarily the part of the industry that I want to ultimately work in, it has been wonderful to work in the industry in some capacity and learn about industrial and educational films. Also, it is a very small company (I am usually one of only five people in the office), so I have taken on a lot more responsibility than I would at a larger production company.

 

How did your experience at TFC help your professional development path?

TFC constantly gives you the opportunity to produce work with a group of your peers, which is exactly what you'll be doing in this industry everyday. I think the school does a great job of introducing you to what it is like to be on a set, problem-solving with a team, and respecting your peers. Professionalism on set, and even in an office, shows your employer that you take the work and yourself seriously.

 

What would you look for if you were in the position to hire new graduates from TFC?

I would be looking for someone who can show up to set, ready to tackle any problem that we encounter, but can also laugh about it after. As much as it can be long and tiring, working on a production is supposed to be fun! I want to work with people who have the same amount of passion that I have. In my experience, a happy crew equals a happy final product. If you're not having any fun doing this, then what's the point?

 

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

I would definitely involve myself more in productions that were happening off campus. There's so much going on at the school that it's easy to only focus on that. But so many students are doing their own things! Your peers are the ones that you will be working with when you graduate school, so start building those connections earlier rather than later.

 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

My biggest piece of advice is to trust yourself and your skill set. This is a very difficult industry that comes with a lot of rejection and there will be times in which you doubt yourself. But if you are persistent and confident, then you will find yourself in a position that you want to be. All the rejection will be worth it in the end.

Jason Lee

Recording Arts

2016 Alumnus 

AV Tech at Compass Group

& AV/DJ at The DJ Firm

What do you like most about working at The DJ Firm, Chicago Stagehand and now Compas Group?

Both jobs, The DJ Firm and Chicago Stagehand, are flexible and you get to say yes or no to whatever jobs they offer you. With Chicago Stagehand it's really great to meet other crew members and learn more from them and network to learn the Audio Visual field better. The DJ Firm Company is small AV tech work but it's another passion I do as a DJ myself.

Thanks to both these jobs is why I got hired at Compass Group as a full-time AV Tech to handle all of their press conferences and meetings!

 

What advice do you have for TFC candidates currently and actively job searching?

​​

After graduating, keep an open mind to trying anything because it does not hurt to learn extra skill sets for certain jobs. Sometimes your career mindset will change especially within the audio industry. 

 

How did your experience at TFC help you secure your current role?

My experience through the Recording Arts program helped me realize to not stick to one skill set. It does not hurt to learn everything they teach you from location audio, live sound, sound design, or recording engineering. This contributed to securing my current position. 

 

What would you look for if you were in the position to hire new graduates from TFC?

Experience and the skill sets candidates have besides what they specialized in.

 

What was your favorite thing about TFC? 

 

My favorite was working with Paul Rodgers doing foley for a full feature film from a filming company. This project was outside of class and I was lucky enough to get chosen by Paul along with two other students to work on a real project like this. 

 

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

Learning hands-on was key for me to understand how things work when I studied Recording Arts. But the most important part of TFC was the networking they had through their Career Services Department and through the teachers as well.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

Well, I wish I did an Internship at a post-production studio during the school year, or on summer break. Other than that, nothing really.

Tyrel Davis

Film 

2017 Alumnus 

Contract Editor at

The Content House Chicago

What do you like most about working at The Content House Chicago as well as additional projects?​

I like the collaboration. Just being under experienced leaders and being able to learn, but still have input and creative freedom is great. Some of my work is televised, so it's great to have that on my Résumé. 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

Build your portfolio! It is an industry where you are defined by the work you have done. Create a massive portfolio, and keep it accessible for potential employers to view it. For example, having your work on your own website. A résumé is only a glimpse of who you are. Having work to actually line up with the credentials on your résumé, gives you an edge. 

 

How did your experience at TFC help you to join your industry? 

 

Collaboration. Working with other departments (Recording Arts, VFX, Writers, etc.), helped me to develop a respect and understanding for every aspect of my craft. People in the industry are often looking for someone who is well rounded, so having knowledge in multiple areas is important.

 

Should the opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates were to come along, what would you look for in candidates?​

For one, people who are easy to work with. No one cares how good your work is if you are stubborn and think you know everything. Be humble and be considerate. Another is their work. Some things look good on paper, but can you do quality work?

 

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

The unlimited resources. The cameras, editing suites, audio suites. The resources are endless at TFC. There's no reason not to create quality work to build your portfolio with the equipment accessible for FREE at Tribeca Flashpoint College.

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges? 

 

Simply, it was small. Which means it is more hands-on than larger schools. That means more attention, which means more knowledge and opportunities.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

I would utilize the free resources more than I did for independent projects. And I would join clubs, for two reasons: For more networking and for more learning. A great peace of advice I got was to join clubs outside of your major. If you are a film student, why not join the Audio Engineer Society and learn some audio? Or even the VFX Club? It's like getting 2 educations for the price of one.

Tyler Hummel

Recording Arts 

2015 Alumnus 

Warehouse Technician

at Rentex and

so much more!

Where are you currently employed and what is your role there?​

Currently I am working multiple gigs. My full time-job is working as a Warehouse Technician at Rentex in Bensenville, IL. There, I work in quality control for one of the fastest growing AV rental companies in the United States. Outside of that I wear a lot of different hats. I am a producer at FVTV Public Access in Aurora, IL where I produce and host a film criticism talk show called The Fox Valley Film Critics. I'm a regular blogger writing film criticism and i'm currently petitioning for a position writing for the geek culture website Geeks Under Grace as a contributor. On weekends I occasionally offer my hand to Center Stage Theater in Naperville, IL where I serve as one of the company's regular AV technicians for children's musicals. In my spare time outside of this, I host a podcast called the GroupThink Podcast and I write and direct films. My last feature, City of Lights, is currently  contesting for multiple film festivals and my next film entitled The Audition, will be shooting this September. 

What do you like most about working in your current role?

 

What I like most about my current station in life is the variety and breadth of work I'm able to do professionally and for fun. I graduated from Tribeca Flashpoint College with a degree in Recording Arts/Sound Design and while I still pursue working within my major, I'm regularly opening myself up to different creative avenues, which has offered me some incredible opportunities as an artist and an adult with bills to pay. 

 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

The best advice I can offer people coming straight out of college is to be open minded. The entertainment industry can be a brutal and unrelenting one with long hours and ridiculous hoops to jump through just to get your foot in the door. You may send out a hundred resumes this year and get one reply. I've taken dozens of opportunities to work and learn in aspects of the industry that don't have anything to do with my major and I was able to develop my skills significantly farther than I would've had if I had focused entirely on sound design. If you have to take a job that isn't exactly what you want it to be to fund your dream projects, then do it. There is no shame and you have more time than you think you do. 

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

Tribeca Flashpoint College does an excellent job imparting the two most important qualities a person needs when entering the industry:

Communication and Professionalism. 

If you lack these two things you will not get your foot in anywhere. Most companies understand that if you're straight out of college you have much to learn and they will take the time to sit down with you and give you what you need to succeed. In order to do that though, you have to have a strong work ethic, a good attitude and the ability to put your best self out there. Learn the best ways to talk with people. Don't hold back when you have a problem. I've seen utter train wrecks occur when one person doesn't relay the smallest bits of information to the appropriate people who need to hear it. 

 

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

I've worked with numerous fellow graduates of TFC at various companies and through various projects I've had the opportunity to work on. Most recently this past February, students from Paul Rodger's Client Services class were able to assist with the sound design for my feature City of Lights. The number one thing I look for beyond talent, which is quite common from TFC students, is the ability to communicate. As I said before, don't be the person who 

doesn't communicate. 

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

The experience of learning at Tribeca Flashpoint is one of trial by fire. You're learning on the job with some of the best equipment money can buy at your finger tips. In my final month at school I got together with a huge group of over a dozen fellow students and collaborated on a sound design/redub on an eight minute segment of DragonBall Z (featuring the voices of Paul Rodgers and Jeff Kliment brilliantly enough.) It was an enormous undertaking on my own time that was done in addition to all of my finals and major sound design projects. Of everything I've worked on, work done while at school is what I've always felt most proud of because of how much passion and work went into it. TFC offers you many insane opportunities and if you can put your passion into your work, you can create some amazing stuff. You just need to take the initiative. 

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

I was first introduced to TFC through my wonderful High School Choir director over four years ago. Upon my first visit and interview at TFC, I was immediately impressed by everything I saw. Though relatively unsure of how I wanted to pursue my future, but sporting a solid affinity towards audio production through my High School Drama Club days, I jumped in feet first and utterly fell in love with sound design. Through two years of hard work I developed my ear into something I could present professionally and here I am now! 

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

If I could go back into the past to tell myself one thing (that would likely be ignored by my younger self) I would tell him rather uncontroversially that I should read more. Not to sound cliché, but reading has come to be the greatest influence I've come to recognize as a filmmaker, film writer and a human being. Find things you like to read. Read comics, thrillers and whatever else grabs your eye. After that, jump into your tech manuals and theory books. As an artist, these are your best friends and you'll learn more than you realize just by reading about your craft. I can't tell you how influenced I was reading David Yewdall's Practical Art of the Motion Picture Soundtrack as he described his in-depth process working as John Carpenter's sound designer. After that, read and analyze the classics. Dig into Dostoyevsky, Hemingway, Twain, Dickens and Shakespeare. Read about art, science, religion, philosophy, history, politics and anything you can get your hands on. The wider your range of knowledge and literary reference, the stronger your work will be. 

 

As I always say, Joss Whedon didn't become a good enough writer to write The Avengers until he was smart enough to understand Shakespeare. 

Jason Cory

Recording Arts 

2014 Alumnus 

Event Technician 

at ENCORE

Event Technologies

What do you like most about working at ENCORE Event Technologies?​

I enjoy how everyday is a different experience. There's a lot of variation to it that requires troubleshooting, problem solving and flexibility.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

Just don't give up. Seriously, job searching is soul crushing because you will go weeks without ever hearing back from all these different places. Just keep working on your side projects and improving your resume.  

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

It gave me a first-hand example of how quick things move in this industry. Nothing in this industry just falls into your lap, you've got to go for it.

 

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

How seriously did they treat their short time at TFC. Were they out at parties every weekend or were they putting spare time in the studios working on side projects? Also, how do they treat their peers. An arrogant person is someone I never enjoy working with.

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

By far, the work ethic shared by the students and the teachers. Even being in the field it's hard to find a group of people all on the same page like that; to get work done and support each other's work. 

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

It was real. Real industry professional teachers working with students on real projects. The staff cared about the school, students, and projects. It only took me one visit to campus to realize that and feel the energy of this place.   

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

Book. More. Studio. Time. Seriously, those studios (and the gear!) are rad and you're gonna miss them when their gone. Make as many student films, tracks, recordings, games as possible in your time there. The fastest and most efficient way to learn is to work on as many projects as possible. You're first ones aren't going to be great, so don't treat them as such (and trust me, the teachers won't either). The more chances you give yourself to learn and experience new things the better off you're going to be.

Ariel Ross

Digital Media, Postproduction

2016 Alumna 

Freelance Video Editor 

at FCBX

What do you like most about working as a freelancer at FCBX?​

The best part of working as a freelancer at FCBX is that I am able to work with a great group of people and I can see myself improving just by being in a really creative environment. I also like that it enables me to still do my own work at the same time.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

Network, network, network! Any person that you meet is a job opportunity waiting to happen. Be sure to tell people what you do and be excited about it – people love it when you love what you do, so let that show!

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

TFC really gives you the tools you need to succeed in the industry. They teach you how to collaborate and how to accept criticism. So much of what you learn in school are not things that you can rate on a scale or even describe, but they teach you how to thrive in this industry in every way.

 

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

People who are passionate about what they do and are fun to work with! You spend more time with your co-workers than your spouse so you really want to work with people who make work a fun place to be. And passion is often more important than skill because if you love it you want to make your work as good as possible as opposed to just getting it done.

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

My favorite thing about TFC was that when I wanted to learn something I had unlimited resources, whether it was teachers, software, or the newest technology - everything was right at my fingertips. When you leave school learning is something you have to search for, but at TFC it was always right there in front of me.

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

I am a do-er and TFC is a place where students don’t just watch, they do. I knew that I wouldn’t need to wait to apply the things I would learn. And from the minute I walked in it was a nonstop whirlwind of learning and doing.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

The only thing I would do differently would be to do MORE. There are so many cool opportunities and awesome people to do them with, and in school you have the time to do those things. I wish I had the time now to just create things that I love, experiment with new technology or find new ways to tell stories.

Molly O'Callaghan

Film

2013 Alumna 

Associate Producer at

Bodega Pictures

What do you like most about working as a Consultant at Bodega Pictures?​

Working for Bodega Pictures as their associate producer is an experience where I get to be creative, technical and am constantly being presented with situations where I get to learn something new. My position requires me to be a leader and self-sufficient. My favorite part for me is the ability to travel around the US to film with all of the wonderful clients who are casted onto my show. 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

While job searching, you have to really invest in filing out an application. Take the time to do your research on the company and who you’re sending your resume to. This industry has become extremely competitive, so being able to  stand out right away is imperative. Never get discouraged if you don’t get the job you really wanted, it will just kill your enthusiasm for the next one.

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

I met the most incredible people while at Tribeca. I had wonderful staff mentors who helped me find my passion while attending school and I accumulated an incredibly valuable group of friends who not only continue to push me creatively, but are my support in Los Angeles.

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

Honesty and communication go a long way. If you’re able to show a strong work ethic, are able to ask questions,  eager to learn and aren’t afraid to communicate your thoughts, I would strongly consider you even if another candidate looks better on paper. People love attributes like that because it shows dedication to a company as well as intent to grow with a company.   

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

Tribeca gave me the tools to experience every aspect of this industry and I think that was my favorite part. Never being limited to one field. 

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

Going to school for two full years without even touching a camera did not appeal to me in the slightest. I am someone who wants to jump right in a learn everything I can, and being able to work on films and write and use the equipment right away was the selling factor for me.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

I had two full-time jobs while going to school and commuting from the suburbs to try and pay for college - so I excluded myself from a lot of creative activities such as 24 hour film festivals, or screening with a Q&A panel, and I really wish I had taken the time to experience those events.

Brandon Sanders

Game & Interactive Media

2015 Alumnus 

Game Engineer:

InContext Solutions

Brandonsanders.work

 

 

I graduated from TFC in May of 2015 and began an internship at InContext Solutions, a virtual store simulation company. Since then, I have been hired full-time as a Game Engineer. The best part of working at InContext is being on a team of excited guys who work hard every day to innovate our industry.

 

My advice for anyone in the job search right now is to look outside your immediate industry. You never know what kind of job you will end up loving. I wanted to be a game programmer when I left school. Now I am working on store simulation software... and it is awesome. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Justin Jackola

    Film & Broadcast

    2010 Alumnus

       Director/Founder:       JJack Productions

      jjackpro.com

 

My favorite part about my job and this industry is working on such unique projects. One week we’ll be filming interviews with disabled kids, and the next week we’ll be filming aerial drone shots for a rap video flying over a yacht on lake Michigan. You meet amazing people, with amazing talent, creating major influence on the world. I also sincerely love the flexibility/challenge of running my own company. It’s insanely challenging and tiring, but worth it in the end.  

 

My advice to you in regards to job hunting is in the following list:

 

  • "We have a strategic plan. It's called doing things"​ - Herb Kelleher, co-founder, Chairman Emeritus, and former CEO of Southwest Airlines. Stay busy making things! The momentum is contagious. 

 

  • Network. Buy business cards. Collect business cards. Look up the person online. Tell them what you enjoy about their work. Then follow up every 4-6 months by creating an excel spreadsheet of all your contacts. I promise it’ll pay off. 

 

  • Watch the crowd. Go the opposite direction. Don’t think there are “normal” ways of doing things. Most rules are made up.                       

  • All opportunities are disguised as problems. That’s what a job is, it’s solving problems and getting paid to do so.

 

  • There is no failure. Only Feedback. Failing just means you pushed yourself further than you were able to go. That’s exactly what you should be doing. 

 

  • Life begins at the end of your comfort zone. Do things you are scared to do. It’s freeing. 

 

  • A disorganized genius is no match for the average person with a daily routine. Make a schedule for yourself and stay busy 8+ hours  a day working on projects in your industry. Especially when you’re looking for a job because it’ll help you get a job.

Eddie Loera
Animation & VFX

2012 Alumnus

Finishing Assistant / VFX Artist: Hootenanny TV

eddieloeravfx.com

I graduated from TFC in 2012 from the Animation & VFX program and I’m currently employed as a Finishing Assistant/VFX Artist at Hootenanny TV; a post production house, working mostly with television spots. I started full-time on 9/24/2012, right after freelancing for them for two weeks.

 

My favorite part of working at Hootenanny TV would have to be the environment and the people. The entire space has a very homey feel to it. Everyone that I work with is easy to get along with and they all have a great sense of humor. Working in a place like this makes it feel like you’re not always at work (which is a good thing!) 

 

It’s really hard to give just one piece of advice to someone who will be, or is currently looking for work. There are so many things that play into the job search that it all seems daunting at first. I guess if there was only one thing I could say to a soon-to-be-graduate or recent graduate, is that you should never give up. If you truly love what you do, you’ll keep working on your craft even after you graduate. A very large majority of students who graduate will not have a job lined up for them right after they walk across the stage; I sure didn’t. Take what you can get, freelance work, internships, anything to get you in the door and continue growing and learning. So, I guess that’s my one piece of advice: never stop learning! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ana De Irisarri

Recording Arts

2015 Alumna

Sound Designer & Music Composer: ARU 

http://www.anadeirisarri.com/

 

 

I graduated from Tribeca Flashpoint College in May of 2015 and began an internship at Audio Recording Unlimited (ARU), where I was then hired as a full-time Sound Designer & Music Composer. The best part of working at ARU is the environment and the people I work with...it's like working with family.

 

My advice for anyone in the job search right now is to leave the mediocrity...just kidding! In all seriousness, this isn't an easy field to break into; but if you love what you do, seek out opportunities, show an interest, and find places where you can show what you're capable of, over time this passion and interest brings positive benefits. Obviously, you have to strive to be the best and always go after more because the competition is huge. Dedication, passion, and hard work, always bring good results.  

Kristian Garrett

Recording Arts

2015 Alumnus

Audio Supervisor:

KGSounds 

www.kgsounds.com

 

I graduated from Tribeca Flashpoint College in May of 2015 and began my own company KGSounds. The best part of working at

KGSounds, is that I am my own boss!

 

As far as advice I have to offer TFC candidates is...Twitter Twitter Twitter! (Translation: Network! Network! Network! Both traditionally and definitely via social media.)

Sean Habel

Game & Interactive

Media

2015 Alumnus

Backend App Developer:

StickOutSocial 

www.stickoutsocial.com

 

What I like most about working at StickOutSocial is definitely the environment. The dynamic of the environment is set up in such a way that you never feel pigeon-held into doing one thing and only one thing. With it being a smaller company, you are not only allowed to grow and learn how to do multiple things, but you are encouraged to. It is fantastic to be surrounded by people who love what they do and who are glad to help you grow. 

 

As far as advice I have to offer TFC candidates is...Twitter Twitter Twitter! (Translation: Network! Network! Network! Both traditionally and definitely via social media.)

I have a few pieces of advice for students currently in the job search. First off, love what you do. If you do not love what you do, it shows. Nothing is more discouraging to employers than seeing the forced smiles and overwhelming dread of someone who is applying to a job that they don't really want. I understand that some situations require you to take a job that you don't love but if that is not the case then there is absolutely no use in taking a job that you don't want to do. Finding what you love to do regardless if you went to school for it will make your life significantly easier. You are more likely to be pushed to excel in something you love to do and you can always find ways to expand your skills. I personally went to Tribeca for Game Programming, something that I loved to do, and found in my second year that I really liked Web Development as well. Without having learned much in terms of backend development, I applied for an internship which I got and then rapidly built up my skills doing web development.

 

I think many people get stuck mentally thinking that they went to school to learn a very specific skill. Well, here is the way I see it: If you focus on learning a specific skill then you are wasting your time. It is far more important to learn how to learn and that may sound confusing at first, but look deeper into it. Being in an industry that involves technology that is constantly evolving, learning a specific skill for a technology that will be outdated in a year or two is not going to be beneficial; but learning to adapt to new technologies and new environments will be forever beneficial.

 

Lastly, I would say don't get discouraged. Finding a job is not always easy, often it isn't easy at all for most people but that doesn't mean give up, it means you try harder. Some jobs are just not meant for you. Some positions do not match your skill set. And even some companies don't match your personality. It is important to find a company that meshes well with your personal beliefs and will help guide your personal growth. Finding a job is as much of you picking the company as it is the company picking you.

Cam Marshall

Film

2015 Alumnus 

Content Production 

Specialist:

Cincinnati Reds

cincinnati.reds.mlb.com

 

What I like most about my job is being able to combine my love for cameras and editing with my passion for sports. The coolest thing about creating a video for a major league baseball team is that during a game I know 60,000 people will all be watching my video at once for the first time.

 

Job searching is very overwhelming, but I would say the best tactic to use during the job search is to try to talk to as many people as possible. Submitting a resume can only get you so far. Send emails and even phone calls. Connect with recruiters on LinkedIn and maybe send a quick "Hello" message. You are trying to show your ambition and stand out to your future employers. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Boyd

Animation & VFX

2015 Alumna 

Creative Intern:

Michael Coleman, LLC

www.eaboyd.com

What I like most about my job is the fact that I get to do more than just editing and I'm continuing to learn outside of what I do specifically.

 

As far as advice is concerned, don't let any opportunity pass you by without at least making every attempt to make it work. So that way, even if it doesn't, you won't be left with any 'what-ifs'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kris Franzen

Recording Arts

2015 Alumnus 

Freelance Location Mixer:

Franzen Audio

franzenaudio.com

What I like most about working at my current employer...besides him being ruggedly handsome? For me, being self employed is very fulfilling knowing that at the end of every job I provided the highest quality work possible to my clients. The best part of my job is that every day is different and I am constantly experiencing new challenges.

 

As far as advice is concerned, remember to look in places that most other candidates will overlook. In today's industry almost every single company has some sort of a multimedia presence. Also when you first begin your career say yes to as many opportunities to both further your reel and professional network. Remember that it is a small and closely knit industry so always leave a great impression.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brad Etter

Film

2010 Alumnus (LA)

Owner at BE Productions

Video Chair at Mr. Kate Productions

As Owner and Writer/Director/Editor at my LA-based production company, BE PRODUCTIONS, I make metaphysical short films, features, and miniseries centered on social change and reclaiming inner divinity. As Video Chair at Mr. Kate Productions, I am responsible for directing and shooting high-production web content centered on interior design, house-flipping, fashion, and lifestyle with my wacky, creative team.

What do you like most about working with your current employer?

I love both of my current places of employment because one (BE Productions) allows me to express my dark and cinematic side, often involving the depiction of heavy social and spiritual concepts, while the other (Mr. Kate) conversely allows me to express my wild, glittery, and shameless millennial side. This balance of gravity and

playfulness gives my LA career a rewarding well-roundedness.

At BE Productions, I am most grateful to have the platform to convey my perspective on important spiritual topics rooted namely in the soul’s experience of being human, told through the lens of fantastical metaphor. As the owner of a fledgling film company, every day is a new experience in balancing my practical and emotional sides: learning the ropes of owning a business while constantly in pre-production for new projects. Our first two films, “Morning Announcements” and “Me + You” have together won seven film festivals, and “Me + You” had the honor of screening in this past year’s Cannes Film Festival. Our next film, “Elevator,” will tackle the notions of karma and the afterlife, and there are many more to follow.

At Mr. Kate Productions, every shoot day is an opportunity to let my millennial wild child loose and see all of my talents glimmer. Mr. Kate, a lifestyle brand akin to Martha Stewart (just way crazier) redefines YouTube content, bringing better-than-TV-quality interior design series, fashion and jewelry look books, reality shows, and DIY content to fabulous life. No shoot is ever remotely the same: when not shooting innovative creative content our LA-based studio, our full-sized crew is all over LA, flipping gorgeous new media celebrity houses and changing lives with boss lady Kate Albrecht’s lavish interior design visions. Working at Mr. Kate for over the past 5 years has given my life color, glamor, and perpetually new and exciting challenges; it really is akin to working at a full-on television network. Check out our channel HERE

Why did you decide to pursue a career in California?

As soon as I graduated from Tribeca Flashpoint Academy in 2010 with a Directing focus, there really was no question that LA was going to be the backdrop of this next chapter of my life. Like countless others, the great plan to move here had been brewing behind my doe-eyes since I was a young child making the most ambitious Lego movies that my dad’s flip camera and steady hand movements would allow. I had a vision for a life of influence, of imparting social and spiritual truths, which I knew a career in film and video could fulfill. So far, it’s been just that.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job

searching?

Really do some soul-searching. Listen deeply to your heart and ask it, first and foremost, who you are and what you wish to see differently in the world. I believe that our paths effortlessly magnetize to us when we put in the effort of magnetizing them. Every single one of us is a storyteller yearning to portray truth in a way that is totally unique and unprecedented. What stories are you questing to tell, and what cinematic weapons will you stock in your arsenal to make them heard?

 

Clamor. Make noise. Even if, for you, making noise means expertly dicing that Adobe Premiere timeline into an award-winning film, or capturing the pristine sound that makes the next Netflix show an immersive experience. Most of all, step out of theory and get on set, because no one project will be the same and will demand your

adaptability.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates considering

moving to LA?

If even a faint part of you is considering the move to LA, I say dive in with both feet. While I’ve seen many of my TFC peers move here and return home after just a few months or years, all of them were grateful for the chance to know for sure that it wasn’t right for them, at least at the time.

 

There really are an infinite number of ways to go with a career path in Los Angeles; this city is your oyster, as they say. When I first moved here in 2010, I had no inkling that I was about to embark on a 5-year journey working as an independent contractor for all sorts of entrepreneurial new media clients - including Mr. Kate, Blogilates, Taryn Southern, to name a few - which allowed me to constantly imagine and create content that required every aspect of my Jack-of-All-Tradesness: writing, directing, storyboarding, shooting, editing, and even dolly operation (my dad and I built this

handy door dolly in the garage of my Chicago home the summer before I moved out here and it has been my secret weapon

ever since!)

Set aside your preconceptions of what exactly you want, because you may not know what that is until it’s happening to you. This town is ready and available for your greatness - just wield your voice, get that show-stopping reel together, and show it who’s boss!

Wallace Kerby

Film

2016 Alumnus 

Filmmaker/Photographer 

Wallace Kerby Website

HERE

What do you like most about your current occupation?

 

My current occupation is Freelancer. What I like most about my occupation is working for myself and being able to have my own schedule and still keeping options open in my career for what I want to pursue.


What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

My advice I have for TFC students seeking jobs, is to always make connections the more you search and always stay active regarding filming networking events, and LinkedIn!


How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry or your field of study? 

 

My experience at TFC helped me join the industry by connecting with some very interesting and important people. The courses and the hands-on experience that TFC has is very beneficial for what you want to do with your career.


What would you look for if you were in the position to hire new graduates from TFC?

 

What I would look for if I were looking for if I were to hire graduates from TFC, is people who are dedicated to the industry, exceeding all deadlines on time, being a team player and making sure the job is getting done.


If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

I would continue my schooling at TFC to receive my Bachelor's along with making my own work and starting my company close to my graduation date.


Knowing what you know now, what advice would you give your High School self?

 

Never procrastinate, always stay focused and continue making connections and keeping all connections as well. You'll never know who you may need.

Hayley Mellish

Film

2015 Alumna 

Office Production Assistant 

at NBC Universal

What do you like most about working in Chicago's TV Production industry?

I like having a lot of responsibility and the opportunity to go very far very quickly. It's not easy, but you learn a lot in a short  amount of time and meet a ton of people. From an office PA perspective, I love watching each episode go from an outline of a script to a finished product and getting to watch each member of the office and crew give 100% to their craft. 

What advice do you have for TFC candidates interested in joining Chicago TV Productions?

Network and self-educate. You need to get used to being thrown into a room of adults you've never met and introducing yourself, because as a PA you will be thrown into a crew of 150 strangers and you will have to confidently navigate that. Also, when it comes time to find your next gig, being social, positive, and outgoing is key. I also recommend self-educating about whatever you want to do. There are tons of websites, blogs, Facebook pages, and podcasts about industry topics. Entry level film industry jobs don't come with very much training, so in order to set yourself apart from the dozens of other people clamoring for work, seek out information that will prepare you and set you apart. 

 

How did your experience at TFC help your professional development path?

TFC helped me most in the sense that it got me used to working hard under tight deadlines. It gave me all of the resources to network and get involved in film organizations outside of school. The schooling was great and very informative, but TFC was very upfront that graduation itself wouldn't get us everything. They really encouraged us to take advantage of the school and faculty's resources while we could.

 

What would you look for if you were in the position to hire new graduates from TFC?

Personality-wise, I would look for someone who is enthusiastic about learning, inquisitive, and not a complainer. Work in this industry can be physically and mentally challenging and anyone who has looked into it should know that. I would look for someone who knows this and is up for the challenge. Resume-wise, it needs to be perfect (no typos, consistent formatting, easy to skim, etc). That piece of paper is sometimes the only thing you have to represent yourself, so make it look nice.

 

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

I would take more advantage of the free equipment and try to learn more about cameras. I would do more passion projects outside of schoolwork.

 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates actively job searching?

Go to networking events, screenings, attend or volunteer at local film festivals, see who's who on IMDB and the DGA website, and cold message industry folks on LinkedIn and email based on your research. Do not be afraid to reach out. Sooner or later you will run into the same people and they will know your face, then your name, then the next time they hear of a gig they'll put your name into the pot. Everyone in this industry relies on word of mouth recommendations when hiring, so you must relentlessly self-promote and follow up with people in order to obtain and sustain employment.

Luke Cody

Game & Interactive Media

2011 Alumnus 

Project Manager at

Jackbox Games

What do you like most about working at Jackbox Games?​

Pretty much everything about working for Jackbox Games has been great, but it’s the people I work with that make it truly exceptional. Everybody here is at the top of their game, and they’re all inspiring to work with. I’m proud of all of the games I’ve been involved in and I still get excited to see our products in stores. With our latest games (The Jackbox Party Packs) we’ve literally created a new genre of party games, it’s been great watching the community around our games grow.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

Perseverance is the name of the game. Don’t give up, keep reaching out to people and always be respectful. It’s also a good idea to be nice to the career service department at TFC, they are a valuable resource and should be taken seriously. I can’t stress this enough, the Career Service Department literally got me my original job that led me to where I am now. Jackbox (at the time Jellyvision Games) reached out to the school with a QA contract opportunity, and in turn Career Services reached out to me. The other important thing is to keep making stuff outside of school, whatever discipline you’re in, potential employers are always going to want to see what you’ve done. Projects done outside of school will almost always be more beneficial than in school projects.

 

How did your experience at TFC help you to join your industry? 

 

My time at TFC introduced me to the video game industry. I’ve always loved games, and I dreamed of actually working on games, but that always felt like a distant possibility. TFC made me realize that I could actually do it and gave me the skills to make it happen. I learned a lot about making games from my fellow students and teachers while working on various school projects. Maybe the most important factor was the Career Services Department, they taught me how to interview, write a resume, and reached out to me when job opportunities were available.

 

Should the opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates were to come along, what would you look for in candidates?​

We always look for strong communication skills and a positive attitude. You need to be able to work in an open office environment and respectfully interact with your co-workers. A high level of skill in your discipline is always desired too, which probably seems obvious. We also look for people who have a strong desire to succeed and push themselves to be their best.

 

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

My favorite thing at TFC was the friends I made. After going to a traditional school at the University of Kentucky, it was a nice change to be surrounded by my fellow game nerds. A close second was the facility itself, and being in downtown Chicago every day was really cool too.

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges? 

 

I knew I wanted to apply to TFC as soon as I walked in for my visit, I was blown away by the inside of the building and all the cool tech I was surrounded by.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

There’s not much I would do differently if I had to do it again, but I would work on more outside projects. One question that constantly came up in interviews was “What published titles have you worked on?” Looking back, I’m confident that I could have gotten a team together and we could have developed and released a published product. There are many options available for indie devs these days, and nothing will help you more than having worked on published titles, unless of course you’re just a genius in your field.

Tyler Hummel

Recording Arts 

2015 Alumnus 

Warehouse Technician

at Rentex and

so much more!

What do you like most about working at Periscope Post & Audio?​

I think my favorite part about working at Periscope Post & Audio is the variety of work that we do and the various hats that I get to wear. On any given week, or even within the same day, I can be an ADR mixer for The Exorcist, a sound designer for feature films like Kickboxer: Vengeance, or a recording engineer on a music session for Empire. We get to do it all. That’s pretty unique thing in the industry, especially in Chicago, which is primarily an advertising town.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

The advice that I have is to continue working on your craft. Even if it is just personal projects. Being good at what you do is what gets you in the door. What keeps you there, and what gets you hired, is the connections and relationships that you have and make with people. When you do great work and people like you, one thing will lead to the next thing, which will lead to the next thing.  

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

TFC gave me all the skills that I need to do my job well. But more importantly, it introduced me to the studio where I would intern, and would later connect me to a freelance project that I would do after graduation. Those two things later lead to the connections and word of mouth that landed me the job that I have now. 

 

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

Like I mentioned before, they have to know how to do the things we ask. It's very important to take full advantage of the early opportunities to impress when they are presented. Then once we know they are talented, we have to like them as people. We work long hours under usually pretty stressful deadlines, which makes it so important to have a group that gets along and works well together. 

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

My favorite part about TFC was the facilities and the class schedule. With TFC being only a two-year school when I attended, we had basically a 9 to 5 class schedule to fit everything in. That made it feel more like work training, than college. I liked that a lot since I knew what I wanted to do. Along with getting trained in what are definitely professional-grade facilities, I was able to quickly adjust to studio life when I got into the industry.

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

Apart from the facilities, what ultimately lead me to attend TFC was the two-year curriculum. This is an industry where the experience that you have and the work you’ve done is more important than the degree. I was able to learn everything I needed to be a good professional in two years and spend the other two gaining experience and building my reel.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

If I had to do it over again, I would have collaborated with more of the other students. When I was at school, I would try work with the same people on all of our group projects. We knew how to work well together and always produced good results. But thinking back, There are other people that I wish I would have collaborated with.

Jason Neumann

Recording Arts 

2012 Alumnus 

Audio Engineer &

Sound Designer at

Periscope 

Post & Audio

Jason Neumann

Recording Arts 

2012 Alumnus 

Audio Engineer &

Sound Designer at

Periscope 

Post & Audio

Colin Uthe

Recording Arts 

2017 Alumnus 

Audio Visual Technician 

at PSAV

What do you like most about working at PSAV?​

Working at PSAV is challenging in the best ways. Every day I get to work with clients and find creative solutions to unique problems. I think that seeing the satisfied look on a client's face when I resolve an issue is my favorite thing about working there. Also, I make tips occasionally.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

Apply for everything in your field, even if it's something you're unsure of. If you're qualified for the job, send in a resumé. If you get the job offer, you can always say no to it. You'd be surprised at the kind of work out there that was totally under your radar.  

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

TFC gave me the opportunity to work with real clients on real projects, and that's the hardest thing about working in the service industry. Client experience is super valuable, and TFC gave me as much of it as I could possibly handle.

 

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

When you receive your degree, I know that you have acquired the technical skills necessary to fulfill your industry's expectations. What I don't know, is your personality and how you handle the service aspect of it. That part is arguably more important than the technical side of the industry. 

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

My favorite thing about TFC was definitely the instructors. Some of the smartest, kindest, and most professional people I have met in my life were teaching me at TFC. I don't have enough hands to count how many friends and mentors I have received from my time at the college.

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

I chose TFC over other colleges because there's no "filler" to my degree. Everything I learned is highly valuable to me in my field, and none of my time was wasted.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

I said no to a few opportunities. They weren't super important, but I wish I said yes to everything thrown at me. Even the smallest connection with someone may result in a big payoff later down the line.

Aaron Quintanilla

Game & Interactive Media

2012 Alumnus 

Consultant at 

Oracle

What do you like most about working at Oracle?​

I enjoy working with our customers and finding solutions to their business problems.  I also really like working with my team, it's a team of very intelligent, funny, awesome people, who I'm very proud to work with.  We are the best at what we do, and it's an honor to be on the team.

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

First, finding a job isn't always easy, and you will almost certainly send out a lot more resumes then you will get calls back, and don't lose hope. Work can come in from anywhere, keep your ears open for opportunities, and treat everyone with respect, you'll find your professional communities are smaller than they seem.

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

Flashpoint honed my teamwork skills and instilled in me leadership that I've brought to my work since.  Everything I've done has been a team effort and the group focused experience at Tribeca made the transition into the professional world seamless. The study of programming definitely gave me a leg up going into the tech field, and I've since leveraged and grown those skills to be a go-to resource to help my team solve technically oriented problems.

 

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

Obviously the skills that helped me succeed would be the first things I'd look for when evaluating potential additions to whatever team I'm working on.  Skills in team-oriented environments is a must, no one in the 'real world' works alone, and integrating into the team is essential. After that, working inside deadlines, technical aptitude, adaptability, and passion for learning are the top skills I'd look for. 

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

The best thing about Flashpoint was the friends I made while there.  Many of us still stay in close contact, and I see them often.  They not only make up integral parts of my professional network, but they are some of the closest relationships I have, and appreciate them greatly, and the opportunity Tribeca gave me to meet them.

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

I chose Flashpoint because it showed the variety of skills needed in game development, and I was interested in learning the breadth of the industry.  In so doing, it introduced me to project management, which has become a passion of mine, in a way that I never would have anticipated.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

I don't know that I'd do a lot differently at Tribeca.  I would have definitely worked harder, especially in my art classes.  I would have pushed my teams for more polish work, narrowed their focus into a smaller number of tasks so that we could have more complete games. I would have spent more time talking to the faculty, they had so much knowledge and experience to soak up, and I would have wanted to take even more advantage of that, it was, and continues to be, invaluable.

Alyssa Venetucci

Film

2013 Alumna 

Post Production

Supervisor at

Idea Farmer

What do you like most about working as a Post Production Supervisor at Idea Farmer?​

Since we are a smaller (but quickly growing!) company, I have so many opportunities to grow and learn about positions outside of my own. I love that I can step into pre-production roles, such as creating shot lists and storyboards, and I get to help out on set as the DIT. It keeps the job interesting and fun. 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

Network with everyone you can! Every job I got in Los Angeles was through a connection I had made while I was still in Chicago.

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

Career services hooked me up with the team at Idea Farmer after I graduated - been there ever since! 

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

I would look for a well developed eye for good editing and an eagerness to learn and grow.  

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

All of the friends I made. A lot of us made the move to LA around the same time, and it made the transition to the new city and learning how to navigate the industry out here so much easier (and fun!)

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

I liked the 2-year program, and the fact that we would be diving right into hands on experience.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

I would try and take a few more PA jobs in Chicago and LA - it never hurts to have on-set experience, no matter what part of the industry you plan on going into.

Alex Kline

Animation & VFX

2011 Alumnus 

3D Generalist/Designer at

Sarofsky

What do you like most about working as a 3D Generalist/Designer at Sarofsky?​

There are many things I really enjoy working at Sarofsky, but if I had to nail down one, it'd be the diverse amount of opportunity there is.  I never know what "hat" I'll be wearing the next week whether it's 3d, compositing, designing, scripting, or learning a new tool.  It can be very challenging at times, but I enjoy it.  And being surrounded by very talented individuals has been an amazing experience. 

What piece of advice do you have for TFC candidates currently job searching?

 

Stay active in the community, continually challenge yourself to learn new things, and don't be shy or afraid to ask for advice.  Look around for meetups in your city relevant to your industry, this will give you exposure to the local community of artists.  A few that come to mind in Chicago are C4D, Nuke, and Houdini.  The technology for our industry is constantly changing and evolving.  Being able to adapt to new trends and software is a must.  That's not to say you have to have practical experience with every application, but just being "aware" of what else is out there can help going into a new challenge.  Lastly, don't be afraid to use your network for help and I don't mean just for job referrals.  There were a lot of things I learned after school regarding freelancing like day rates, challenging bids, and general networking.  Finding someone who has been in the industry and is willing to share their experience, as well as give you feedback, can be invaluable.

 

How did your experience at TFC help you join your industry? 

Tribeca Flashpoint gave me the exposure to the latest tools and workflows in my industry.  The environment they provided to collaborate and learn with fellow classmates has been applicable to working industry.

What would you look for if an opportunity to potentially hire TFC graduates come along?

 

In my experience representing Sarofsky at job fairs in Chicago.  It's always more impressive when a candidate is prepared and knowledgeable about the work a company produces, not just the recent work.  And bonus if they took the time to understand the type of company it is.  Most of the time, you can find out what's important to that company by checking the social media posts (Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, etc).

What was your favorite thing about TFC?

 

I think the one thing I really appreciated was the culture at Tribeca Flashpoint.  Being surrounded by like-minded individuals, who were eager to learn and create something "cool". 

Name one thing that made you choose TFC over other colleges?

 

While the location was certainly one of the key factors, it was the school's very different approach to education for digital media arts that I found appealing.  Instead of a traditional 4-year school, they offered a two-year program with an exclusive focus on digital media arts.  And tailoring the gen-ed classes and curriculum to help bridge the disconnect between the relevancy of the class subject matter and our industry.  I'm glad I had the opportunity to experience the school in those early years and be surrounded by a talented group of instructors.

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

 

Knowing what I know now, and if I had access to the number of online resources related to 3d/vfx.  I'd still attend a 2-year technical school and in addition, take online courses.  The school would provide a good foundation for familiarity with the industry and a network afterward.  The online classes would allow sharpening skills outside of the classroom as well as cover topics that were not covered in school.

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